Regular Posts Tagged : ‘racial reconciliation’
7 years ago 0
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7 years, 2 months ago 0

  by Diana Chandler NEW ORLEANS (BP) — African American pastors in the New Orleans Baptist Association say the election of Fred Luter as the Southern Baptist Convention’s first vice president is important evidence that the SBC has departed from the racial exclusion of its past. They say the SBC has worked diligently to embrace African Americans and other ethnic groups, especially since the convention’s 1995 public apology for its past support of slavery. Yet they regard Luter’s election as […]

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7 years, 2 months ago 0

Recognizing that the body of Christ is made up of members from every tongue, hue and culture, the Reconciliation Ministry of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) welcome you to our journey toward wholeness at God’s abundant table. As one of the four mission priorities of our Church, Reconciliation Ministry welcomes you to our intentional effort to become a Pro-Reconciling/Anti-Racist church – a church where the gifts of all of God’s children are honored and shared. To view how this […]

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7 years, 4 months ago 0

In the linked article below, Christianity Today writer Edward Gilbreath examines why blacks are leaving evangelical ministries. Exit Interviews | Christianity Today | A Magazine of Evangelical Conviction. Edward Gilbreath is editor of Today’s Christian and author of Reconciliation Blues: A Black Evangelical’s Inside View of White Christianity (InterVarsity, 2006), from which this article was adapted. Originally posted on January 15, 2007.

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7 years, 5 months ago 0

Reconciliation Blues: A Black Evangelical’s Inside View of White Christianity, Edward Gilbreath (Ed. Urban Ministries & Christianity Today) Journalist Edward Gilbreath gives an insightful, honest picture of both the history and the present state of racial reconciliation in evangelical churches. He looks at a wide range of figures, such as Howard O. Jones, Tom Skinner, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Jesse Jackson and John Perkins. Charting progress as well as setbacks, his words offer encouragement for black evangelicals feeling alone, […]

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